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LUISS Guido Carli

International public policies - Canale A

Programma

ProfessorMattia Guidi
Course codeM108
General Discipline (SSD)SPS/11
Course Year1
SemesterI Semestre
CourseA
Teaching LanguageEnglish
Credits8
Total Workload200
Total Lesson Hours64
Course ContentsThe course will begin by defining what public policies are, and why and how they are adopted. It will explore the rational choice institutionalist literature to understand how state solve collective action problems related to public policies. The course will then go through the main international public policies. It will first analyse the development of international economic governance, with a particular attention to the processes of economic globalization. The course will then turn to other international public policies: trade, monetary and financial policies, regional integration, human rights and international crimes policies. For every policy, the course will present an overview of its historical evolution, of the institutional structure set up to ensure coordination among states, and of the main actors involved in the policy formulation and decision-making process. The course will also have sessions in which the
students will be invited to debate on problematic aspects and questions of globalization, and compare possible solutions.
Reference Books► Sobel, A. (2012) International Political Economy in Context, Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.
► Hurd, I. (2011). International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
► Haas, P. M. e Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press.

Other articles and papers in the syllabus will be uploaded on the course’s web page.
Course Formative ObjectivesThe course aims at providing the students with a comprehensive knowledge of the main public policies managed at the international level, both relating to economic cooperation and to peace and security. For every policy, the course will analyse: a) the reasons why states collaborate and coordinate among themselves to provide public policies; b) the institutions that are created for this purpose; c) the results that have been achieved.
PrerequisitesBA in political science or related field
Teaching MethodLectures and debates on the most relevant issues. Students’ participation during lectures is strongly encouraged and will form part of the final assessment.
Assessment MethodMid-term exam (50%), term paper (50%).
The term paper will be a homework assignment of maximum 4,000 words. Up to three points can be assigned for class participation and presentation in the debates.
Criteria For Deciding On Subject Of Final PaperGrade not less than 28/30, high interest and active participation during the course.
Extended Program And Reference Reading Material
Week 1Introduction to the course.
The international system
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘Structure, Nation-States, Power, and Order in an International Context’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 54–111.
Week 2International public policies: what they are and why they are adopted.
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘The Dilemma of Collective Action: Who Organizes, Who Does Not, and Why’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 202–220.
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘The Role of Institutions in Political and Economic Market Failure’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 277–313.

International organizations: theoretical approaches
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘Introduction to international organizations’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–14.
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘A guide to the study of international organizations’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 15–36.
► Gilligan, M. J., and Johns, L. (2012). Formal Models of International Institutions. Annual Review of Political Science, 15(1), 221–243.
Week 3Globalization and economic public policies: the origins of globalization and the two World Wars
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘Around the World in Eighty Days: A Stage of Modern Globalization’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 317–366.
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘The World between the Wars: A Breakdown in Globalization’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 367–414.

Globalization and economic public policies: the Bretton Woods system and its crisis
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘The Bretton Woods System: The Rebuilding of Globalization’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 415–463.
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘Détente and the End of the Cold War’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 464–510.
Week 4Globalization and economic public policies: the evolution since the end of the Cold War
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘The World Post-Bretton Woods: Globalization Advances’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 511–532.
► Sobel, A. (2012) ‘Into the Future: Political and Economic Market Failures and Threats to Globalization’, in A. Sobel, International Political Economy in Context. Los Angeles: CQ Press, pp. 533–566.

Economic and financial public policies: the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 66–96.
► Frieden, J. (2016). The Governance of International Finance. Annual Review of Political Science, 19(1), 33–48.
Week 5Debate: inequality and financial crises
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 3: ‘Poverty: Can Foreign Aid Reduce Poverty?’.
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 4: ‘Financial Crises: Will Preventing Future Financial Crises Require Concerted International Rule-Making?’.

Trade policies and the World Trade Organization
► Milner, H.V. (1999) ‘The political economy of international trade, Annual Review of Political Science, 2(1): 91–114.
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘The World Trade Organization’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 37–65.
Week 6Debate: international trade and development
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 1: ‘Trade Liberalization and Economic Growth: Does Trade Liberalization Contribute to Economic Prosperity?’.
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 2: ‘Trade and Equality: Does Free Trade Promote Economic Equality?’.

Economic integration policies: the European integration process
► Wallace, H., Pollack, M. A., and Young, A. R. (eds.) (2010) Policy-making in the European Union (6th edition). Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 3–44.
Week 7Economic integration policies in the EU: competition policy
► Guidi, M. (2017) ‘EU competition policy in context’, in M. Guidi, Competition Policy Enforcement in EU Member States: What is Independence for?, Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 13–48.
► Guidi, M. (2015) The Impact of Independence on Regulatory Outcomes: the Case of EU Competition Policy, JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies, 53(6), 1195–1213.

Economic integration policies in the EU: the Single Market and the Economic and Monetary Union
► Hix, S. and Høyland, B. (2011) ‘Economic and Monetary Union’, in S. Hix and B. Høyland, The Political System of the European Union, 3rd edition, Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 245–272.
► Iversen, T., Soskice, D., and Hope, D. (2016). The Eurozone and Political Economic Institutions. Annual Review of Political Science, 19(1), 163–185.
Week 8Rehearsal of the first part of the course

Mid-term exam
Week 9Debate: the Euro crisis
► De Grauwe, P. (2013). A fragile Eurozone in Search of a Better Governance. The Economic and Social Review, 43(1), 1–30.
► Scharpf, F. (2015). Democracy large and small: Reforming the EU to sustain democratic legitimacy on all levels. Juncture, 21(4), 266–272.
► Fabbrini, S. (2016). The constitutional conundrum of the European Union. Journal of European Public Policy, 23(1), 84–100.
► Bulmer, S. (2014) ‘Germany and the Eurozone Crisis: Between Hegemony and Domestic Politics’, West European Politics, 37(6), 1244–63.

International security policies: the United Nations and the NATO
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘The United Nations I: Law and administration’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 97–132.
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘The United Nations II: International peace and security’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 97–132.
► Wallander, C. A. (2000). Institutional Assets and Adaptability: NATO After the Cold War. International Organization, 54(4), 705–735.
Week 10Debate: conflict resolution and terrorism
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 9: ‘International Conflict: Is War Likely Between the Great Powers?’.
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 5: ‘Terrorism and Security: Is International Terrorism a Significant Challenge to National Security?’.

Human rights and international crimes policies: the International Criminal Court and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
► Hurd, I. (2011) ‘The International Criminal Court’, in International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 217–244.
► Loescher, G. (2001). The UNHCR and world politics: state interests vs. institutional autonomy. International Migration Review, 33–56.
Week 11Debate: human rights and democracy
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 7: ‘Military Intervention and Human Rights: Is Foreign Military Intervention Justified by Widespread Human Rights Abuses?’.
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 17: ‘Democracy: Should All Nations Be Encouraged to Promote Democratization?’.

Environmental public policies
► Mitchell, R. B. (2003). International environmental agreements: A Survey of Their Features, Formation, and Effects. Annual Review of Environment and Resources, 28(1), 429–461.
► von Stein, J. (2008). The International Law and Politics of Climate Change: Ratification of the United Nations Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 52(2), 243–268.
Week 12Debate: sustainable development and immigration
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 11: ‘The Future of Energy: Should Governments Encourage the Development of Alternative Energy Sources to Help Reduce Dependence on Fossil Fuels?’.
► Haas, P. M. and Hird, J. A. (eds.) (2013) Controversies in globalization: contending approaches to international relations, Second edition. Los Angeles: SAGE/CQ Press. Chapter 14: ‘Immigration: Should Countries Liberalize Immigration Policies?’.

Final rehearsal